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What is NLP?
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NLP Explorations
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Mahalo
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Events and Options
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Strategies for Spiritual Mastery
Strategies for Spiritual Mastery
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NLP Services
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Wisdom of the Q'ero
Wisdom of the Q'ero
Ceremony Design
Ceremony Design
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About Us
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Aloha – is from the Hawaiian language, and is used in many similar ways to represent hello, friendship, compassion, charity, love or goodbye. The deeper meaning is the JOYful (oha) … Sharing (alo) … of Life Force energy (ha) … in the Present (alo). One use of aloha is in the context of Aloha Spirit, the attitude of friendly acceptance for which the Hawaiian Islands have become known so widely. Aloha can also represent a powerful way to accomplish any goal, resolve any challenge, or achieve any state of mind or body that one desires.  See Huna and HA Prayer. Top of Page

Aloha Principle – in another use as one of the principles of Huna, represents that Love in its two aspects of being and becoming create the universe and humans. When we acknowledge Love, we are happy as we are now AND as we are becoming. Love involves the creation of happiness. Connected to the Huna principles, Aloha represents the concept that ‘To Love is to be Happy With’, and is symbolized by the color green and the quality of love. Top of Page

Apu – a Quechua word referring to a spiritual being who is one of the great mountain peaks. An alto mesayoq, a paq'o or shaman, of extraordinary abilities may communicate directly with some of the great mountains in the vast region of the Andes which that Apu watches over. The plural is Apukuna and is often seen written as Apus. Top of Page.

Ayni  – a Quechua word which represents the Andean concept of 'reciprocity'. Ayni provides the foundation for how the Andean people relate to each other and remain in relationship with Nature. It is integral at all levels of relationship. In Andean villages people work on projects on each other's land, helping and benefiting from each other's help. Someone who requests healing give the paq'o, or shaman, a gift and receive healing in return. Paq'os give gifts to the Apus, or mountain spirits, and the Apus tell them what a person needs to be healed. In such exchanges, what is given is a balancing of the relationship, a way of being that keeps energy flowing in a circular fashion between the participants. Top of Page

Andean Cosmology – refers to a world view held by indigenous tribes in the high Andes, also called Andean mysticism, a school of esoteric thought or ancient wisdom which encompasses such fundamentals as ayni, energetic balance, and harmony with the beauty of the world.  As Don Americo Yabar expresses it, “The Andes is filled with spirits. All the Andean world is populated by spirits, making clear that a 'spirit' is a subtle and vital energy that warms life and taking into account that the being of the universe is life.  LIFE!  Every thing has a spirit.”. Top of Page

Ceremony Design – refers to a 3 part process to gather information, create a design and conduct a ceremony to mark or commemorate a ‘rite of passage’.  A ceremony is often thought of as a well known and traditional event connected to very specific elements which are necessary and expected, as many weddings and funerals demonstrate.  Yet moving beyond the sometimes limited cultural maps or expectations, one can design a personalized ceremony to honor or emphasize any significant life event.  Your custom designed ceremony can include only the perfect blend of elements, symbols, actions and participants to bring to life the best celebration.  JoyTech offers the service of ceremony design to encourage individuals, groups and communities to craft their own traditions and create new rituals, perhaps borrowing from an eclectic mix of cultures, spiritual perspectives, creative expressions and joyful experiences. Top of Page

Cuya – refers to a stone that has been recognized, and come into relationship with a human. From Andean cosmology, what if one considers that everything is alive … and everything has a spirit. This takes the English language word of ‘thing’ out of the realm of inanimate or dead. Certain stones may attract one’s attention, and if a person can be open to connection, then a relationship can begin. The dialogue between the two, the cuya and the human, can reveal the qualities or characteristics unique to that particular stone. When a stone is recognized as a cuya, one has perhaps found a friend. Top of Page

HA Prayer – refers to a prayer for the future, or a process for manifesting, which is brought about by the integrated efforts of all three composite selves. In Huna, a form of Hawaiian mythology, there is Lono, the Conscious mind or Middle Self; Ku, the Unconscious Mind or Low Self; and Amakua (or Kane), the Superconscious Mind or High Self.  According to Huna, Lono cannot send information or energy directly to Amakua.  It must always pass down to Ku, and then Ku can trasmit up to Amakua. The purpose of the HA Prayer is to send a message of change and transformation from Lono, the Middle Self, to Ku, the Lower Self, then up to Amakua, the High Self. Top of Page

Ho’ oponopono – is a Hawaiian word which means to correct or make right, to come to balance. In the Hawaiian culture, this also refers to a process of setting things right or bringing a person or an ohana to balance.  Each individual within the ohana strives to stay in balance to maintain health and unity with all others. This process is also a way of forgiveness. Top of Page

Hucha – refers to one of two types of energy.  Hucha is heavy, stagnant or disordered energy, created only by humans through our behaviors and thoughts, and it can be lodged in our bodies leading to imbalance, distress or illness.  In Andean cosmology or mysticism, there is no distinction between right or wrong, good or bad.  Instead the people of the high Andes are masters at noticing how energy is configured. If moving and flowing appropriately, it is sami or light energy - coherent, refined, essential life energy – and all is well. If not, it is simply hucha, or heavy energy, which can be cleared and released. Top of Page

Huna – refers to a form of esoteric wisdom from Polynesia and the Hawaiian islands.  The actual word, huna, means secret in the Hawaiian language. Serge King has been a source of present day understandings of this ancient wisdom school. Top of Page

Ike – is a Hawaiian word which represents a cornerstone principle of Huna, that one creates her/his own personal experience of reality. The collection of persistent thoughts and actions, which include one’s beliefs, expectations, attitudes, desires, fears, judgments, and feelings, creates each person’s unique experience of ‘reality’.  This principle also enfolds within it the powerful precept that by changing one’s thinking, the world can change. Connected to the Huna principles, Ike represents the concept that ‘The World IS What You Think It Is’, and is symbolized by the color white and the quality of awareness. Top of Page

Kahiki  – refers to a Hawaiian word which is commonly thought to be a Hawaiian variation of Tahiti.  The literal meaning of Kahiki is any place out of sight – perhaps out in the cosmos or outer space, beyond the horizon, in another dimension or in the spirit world. Early Hawaiian authors used Kahiki in those ways. Top of Page

Kala  – is a Hawaiian word which means to free or release. Kala also represents a principle of Huna, that there are no real boundaries … between you and your body, you and other people, you and the world, or you and God. Connected to the Huna principles, Kala represents the concept that ‘There are NO Limits’, and is symbolized by the color red and the quality of freedom. An additional meaning of this principle is that there are unlimited potentials for creativity.  You can create, in some form or another, anything you can conceive. Top of Page

Kalana– is a Hawaiian word which can mean release or forgiveness. Top of Page

Kalana Hula  – is a Hawaiian ‘energy dance’ or moving meditation based in part on lua, a Hawaiian martial art, along with sacred elements of hula. Breath, movement and imagination are synchronized to create the experience of communion with elemental forces and the varied forms of nature, as well as connection and harmony with the immediate environment.  Kalana Hula often results in the enhancement of one’s mana, or personal energy. Top of Page

Kala ‘ana – another Hawaiian word which represents forgiveness or absolution. Top of Page

Kawsay Pacha – a Quechua word which represents the Andean concept the world of living energy with which we continually interact. Top of Page

Mahalo – is a word from the Hawaiian language which means to give thanks, gratitude, praise, appreciation. The root components which build this powerful, sacred concept are … Ma (In) + (breath) + alo (presence, front, face).  Using Mahalo correctly, as a single word prayer or blessing and an acknowledgement of the Divine within and without, might be more deeply experienced as “May you be in Divine Breath”. Top of Page

Makia  – is a Hawaiian word which represents a principle of Huna, that the thoughts and feelings that one dwells on, in full awareness or not, form the blueprint for bringing into one’s life the nearest available equivalent experience to those same thoughts and feelings.  Directed attention is the channel for the flow of biological as well as cosmic energy.  Connected to the Huna principles, Makia represents the concept that ‘Energy flows where Attention Goes’, and is symbolized by the color orange and the quality of focus. Top of Page

Mana – is a word from the Hawaiian language which symbolizes a particular kind of power or energy. As one lives Aloha – sharing joyful, life force energy as a natural way of being in the world – this opens the way for attuning to a larger or Divine Power called mana by the Hawaiians. In that tradition, the loving use of mana holds the simple, yet profound secret for attaining true happiness, optimum health, success and prosperity.  Connected to the Huna principles, Mana represents the concept that ‘All Power Comes from Within’, and is symbolized by the color blue and the quality of confidence. Top of Page

Manawa  – is a Hawaiian word which represents a principle of Huna, that people are not bound by any experience of the past, nor by any perception of the future … but that each individual has the power in the present moment to change limiting beliefs and consciously plant the seeds for a desired future. Connected to the Huna principles, Manawa represents the concept that ‘NOW is the Moment of Power’, and is symbolized by the color yellow and the quality of power. Top of Page

NLP – refers to a particular area of study and exploration originally formulated by John Grinder and Richard Bandler.  The initials stand for Neuro Linguistic Programming.  NLP incorporates both the science of structure and the artistry  of effective communication. Utilizing NLP skills, tools & techniques allows one to generate exceptional performance and create excellence in all arenas of one’ s life. Top of Page

Nomadic Light Patrol – refers to a unique acronym for NLP, one which captures the essence of service and a way of making the highly effective rapport and communication skills of NLP a daily practice. A Nomadic Light Patroller has the intent of engaging in any interaction with another – whether a stranger, random store clerk, friend or family member – as a way to leave the other in a more positive or resourceful state than when the interaction was begun. Top of Page

Ohana – is a word from the Hawaiian language, referring to a family, extended family or clan. Ohana members commit to staying in loving connection, supporting each other in many ways, aspiring to the best that a family structure can offer. Top of Page

Paq'o: Andean mystic, shaman, master of ceremonies, or diviner. Paq'os may be a pampa mesayoq or an alto mesayoq and other distinctions may be made for levels of development within these categories. Top of Page

Pele – refers to a goddess figure from the Hawaiian islands. The most commonly known version of the legend casts Pele as the volcano goddess, connected to the crater of Kilauea on the island of Hawaii, also called the Big Island. The Hawaiian word ‘pele’ means molten lava.  Some misconceptions of the qualities of Pele include volcanic eruptions or destructive lava flows stimulated by jealousy or arrogance.  According to Serge King, consistent attention and respect, perhaps even worship, for Pele has lasted longer than that for any other of the old gods. Top of Page

Phobia  – refers mainly to an irrational fear of something, which is not necessarily an illness, a mental disorder, nor a condition stemming from a lack of will-power or determination.  Generally a phobia is set up by a one trial learning episode which is a traumatic event.  A phobia of flying can make one's life miserable, cause embarrassment, and undermine self confidence and self esteem. Top of Page

Piko  – is a Hawaiian language word which represents both the crown of the head and the navel. Piko Piko breathing, or point to point, is a simple breathing process used for increasing personal mana, enhancing the blessing practice, grounding, centering, meditation and healing. Piko Piko requires no special place or posture; may be done while moving or still, busy or resting, with eyes open or closed; and in its simplest form is moving your attention to the crown of your head, either by awareness or touch, as you inhale and then moving your attention on your navel as you exhale.  Continue breathing with shifting awareness from crown to navel for several cycles. Top of Page

Pono  – is a Hawaiian word which represents a principle of Huna, that in an infinite Universe, there cannot be an absolute truth … only an effective truth at an individual level of consciousness. So since the understanding of all systems of knowledge are arbitrary, one can feel free to use whatever works. Connected to the Huna principles, Pono represents the concept that ‘Effectiveness is the Measure of Truth’, and is symbolized by the color violet and the quality of wisdom. Top of Page

Quechua – refers to a constellation of languages of the indigenous tribes of the Americas, widely spoken across the Central Andes before the Incas; consisting of 46 dialects; still spoken today by 10 million people extensively in Peru, Bolivia, southern Colombia and Ecuador, northwestern Argentina and northern Chile.  One of the Quechuan dialects is spoken by the Q'ero people of the high Andes. Top of Page

Q'ero - refers to a Quechuas tribe who live in one of the most remote places in Peru - in the high Andes, in the Vilcanota Range, near the province of Paucartambo in the Cusco region. The Q'ero were only recently discovered by 'western' culture when Dr. Oscar Nuñez del Prado encountered them at a festival in Paucartambo in late 1940’s and early 1950’s. Beginning in the 16th century, the Q'ero had begun moving higher and higher into remote regions of the Andes where they avoided contact with the changes brought about by the conquest and colonization. The tribe was able to retain a purer lineage of Inca culture and language as they continued to practice their unique mystical path to life. The Q’ero preserved their profound communion with the natural world and their energetic traditions. They are a rare example of how to live in complete harmony and reciprocal exchange with all of nature. Top of Page

Rapport – refers to a way of communicating which results in a feeling of connecting with another, building harmony, trust and cooperation.  From the NLP realm, the ability to establish and maintain rapport is considered to be an important, even essential, relational skill.  The Latin meaning is to bring again, or to carry back.  If the world of real estate is centered around location, location, location; then within the realm of effective communication the essential element is rapport, Rapport, RAPPORT. Top of Page

Spiritual Mastery – refers to the unique and individual formula or recipe which each individual inherently possesses for connection to Spirit and mastering life’s challenges.  When one connects with her/his own inner Spiritual Master, the seeking journey can be transformed into Beingness, sometimes called Presence or Oneness.  Life and relationships and circumstances continue to occur, as the mundane tasks of living in a human body on this planet at this time and space are handled in a practical way.  Yet there is also the spontaneous and simultaneous awareness of sacred, the Divine or Spirit within each moment. Top of Page

Spiritual Mastery Consortium  – one way of naming an ‘ohana’ or family of like-minded explorers. The core members of this SMC ohana share an incredibly diverse mix of common interests - including but certainly not limited to - Evolutionary NLP, energy healing, shamanic practices, cross-cultural connections, expressive art, ecstatic dance, clean space … and the list goes on. For 2009, our SMC ohana is playing with Year of the Breath. See ohana. Top of Page

Technology of Joy – refers to a set of precision tools, a way of thinking, feeling and being which allows one to live within the state of Joy, experiencing and expressing all aspects and contexts of Life through the lens of Joyfulness.  A defining quality of this way of being is the absence of internal conflict, which then makes way for harmony, peace, connection, balance and loving. The ‘How-To’ which each person discovers to unveil and utilize her/his unique Technology of Joy are plentiful, diverse and many-faceted.  Different cultures, traditions, schools of wisdom, teachers and technologies can serve as effective guides – each offering a distinctive perspective within our global Wisdom of the Full Circle. Top of Page

Well Formed Outcome -  A powerfully effective way of gathering information about an issue or problem is to first ask the NLP outcome question, “What do I want?”  This focuses the mental search for answers in a defined direction, one that is inherently solution-oriented and can generate specific and essential data about your goal or desire.  Contrast that to a standard question asked by many people helpers – whether friends trying to be supportive or professional advisors  – “What is the problem?”  You can ask each of these questions in sequence, and notice the differences generated by the answers. The first takes you in the positive direction of resolution.  The other leads you down the all too familiar path of being in your problem, yet again.   Top of Page

Don Americo Yabar – is an internationally recognized mystic, shaman and visionary poet. Raised in Paucartambo, Peru, a small pueblo within the Cordillera Vilcanota in the eastern Andes, he came of age in an atmosphere of Paq'os, the shamans and mystics of the native Q'ero, guardians of the ancient Incan traditions. The Q’ero consider Don Americo a brother and a Pacharuna, a 'living bridge of feeling between cultures'. Together, Don Americo and the Q'ero travel the highest path of human consciousness and participate in energizing the spiritual domain through sacred offerings, traditional rituals, and the sacrament of everyday life. An expert in the internal and external aspects of the transformation of energy, he has shared his teaching in Peru, the U.S., Europe, Africa, and Asia as a bridge for the spiritual blossoming of the planet. Top of Page